Ilya Kabakov «The Man Who Flew Into Space From His Apartment» 1968-96.


Ilya Kabakov, The Man Who Flew Into Space From His Apartment

«I built the installation The Man Who Flew into Space in the corner, I glued Soviet posters from inside of it and I would take it down after each showing for fear that they would drop in, understand, and that would be 'the end of everything.'» ~ Ilya Kabakov.

Ilya Kabakov, The Man Who Flew Into Space From His Apartment

«In 1968 Kabakov had his first Soviet exhibition with good artist friend Erik Bulatov. This exhibition however was small and risky. Kabakov wanted to exhibit his work but there was little government tolerance for it. With a lack of exhibition space, Kabakov put to use text and books to display his work. He created many albums of subtle commentary. He also held short private exhibitions in his apartments.»

Ilya Kabakov, The Man Who Flew Into Space From His Apartment
«The pyrotechnics of the harshly lit Man Who Flew into Space drew the most attention, in part because it looked so Soviet. This man had papered his walls with Soviet propaganda posters and built a makeshift catapult with which he had apparently launched himself through the ceiling, into the beyond. All that remained in the room were the bed, the table scattered with drawings, the catapult and an impressive hole in the ceiling from which light poured in. The room had been boarded up by the authorities, as a text panel informed us in the most bureaucratic of languages.»

from Ilya Kabakov Flies into His Picture, Amei Wallach Art in America, Nov, 2000.

Ilya Kabakov, The Man Who Flew Into Space From His Apartment
The Man Who Flew Into Space From His Apartment, 1968-1996.
Installation: six poster panels with collage; mixed media Room dimensions 37 3/4 x 37 1/2 x 57 7/8 inches (96 x 95 x 147 cm) Centre Georges Pompidou, Musée d” Art Moderne, Paris.

Ilya Kabakov, The Man Who Flew Into Space From His Apartment

sources: uiuc.edu, artinamerica